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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole region

Published source details

Balas C.J., Euliss N.H. & Mushet D.M. (2012) Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole region. Wetlands, 32, 333-345


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Replant vegetation Amphibian Conservation

A site comparison study in 2005–2006 of four restored wetlands in restored grasslands in the Prairie Pothole Region, USA (Balas, Euliss Jr. & Mushet 2012) found that wetlands within restored grasslands were used more frequently by amphibians than those within farmland, but not as much as those within native prairie grasslands. This was true for two frog, one toad and one salamander species. Four wetlands from each category were selected: farmed (drained with ditches), conservation grasslands (wetland hydrology restored, area reseeded with perennial grassland ≤ 10 years previously) and native prairie grasslands (natural). Call surveys, aquatic funnel traps and visual encounter surveys were undertaken biweekly in May–June 2005–2006.

 

Restore wetland Amphibian Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2005–2006 of four restored wetlands in restored grasslands in the Prairie Pothole Region, USA (Balas, Euliss Jr. & Mushet 2012) found that the restored wetlands were used more frequently by amphibians than wetlands within farmland, but not as much as natural wetlands within native prairie grasslands. This was true for two frog, one toad and one salamander species. Four wetlands from each category were selected: farmed (drained with ditches), conservation grasslands (wetland hydrology restored, area reseeded with perennial grassland ≤ 10 years previously) and native prairie grasslands (natural). Call surveys, aquatic funnel traps and visual encounter surveys were undertaken biweekly in May–June 2005–2006.