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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Provision of wildlife cover strips fails to increase over-winter survival and breeding densities of grey partridge Perdix perdix on farmland in the Beauce, Grande Beauce and Champagne Berrichonne regions, central France

Published source details

Bro E., Mayot P., Corda E. & Reitz F. (2004) Impact of habitat management on grey partridge populations: assessing wildlife cover using a multisite BACI experiment. Journal of Applied Ecology, 41, 846-857


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study from 1998-2003 (three years habitat manipulation and three years monitoring) in four cereal farms (12-20 km2) in the Beauce, Grande Beauce and Champagne Berrichonne regions, France (Bro et al. 2004) found that grey partridge populations were unaffected by cover strips. Neither breeding density nor the reproductive success of breeding pairs increased in managed compared to control areas. The survival rate was significantly lower in managed areas for all winters except for one winter in one site. Observations suggested that cover strips attracted predators, such as foxes Vulpes vulpes and hen harriers Circus cyaneus, causing the managed land to become ‘ecological traps’. Cover strips (500-1,000 ha/farm) were either set-asides or, typically, a maize-sorghum mixture.

 

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Farmland Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study from 1998 to 2003 (three years habitat manipulation and three years monitoring) in four cereal farms (12-20 km2) in the Beauce, Grande Beauce and Champagne Berrichonne regions, France (Bro et al. 2004) found that grey partridge Perdix perdix populations were unaffected by cover strips. Neither breeding density nor the reproductive success of breeding pairs increased in managed compared to control areas. The survival rate was significantly lower in managed areas for all winters except for one winter in one site. Observations suggested that cover strips attracted predators, such as foxes Vulpes vulpes and hen harriers Circus cyaneus, causing the managed land to become ‘ecological traps’. Cover strips (500-1,000 ha/farm) were either set-asides or, typically, a maize-sorghum mixture. Partridges were surveyed in March and mid-December to early-January to assess overwinter mortality, and in August to assess reproductive success.