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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Polyculture of sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) suspended from sea cages

Published source details

Parsons G.J., Shumway S.E., Kuenstner S. & Gryska A. (2002) Polyculture of sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) suspended from sea cages. Aquaculture International, 10, 65- 77


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Integrated aquaculture systems Sustainable Aquaculture

Between 1994 and 1996, a replicated, controlled study at two sites in Maine, USA (Parsons et al., 2002) found that shell height and survival of sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus was greater on drop lines adjacent to salmon cages compared to benthic cages. Percentage survival of the scallops held for one and a half years in the pearl nets (72.7% and 63.9%) was higher than that of those in benthic cages (28% and 32.0%) at both sites and was the case for each sampling date. Mean shell height in the pearl nets (73.0 mm and 69.0 mm) was also higher than that of those in benthic cages (68.5 mm and 52.0 mm) after one and a half years. Pearl nets comprised of drop lines containing ten nets at 3m depth were deployed 4m away from salmon cages at two sites and sampled every four months for eighteen months. Benthic cages of modified lobster traps were deployed 100m away from salmon cages at depth of 10 and 15m at each site. The authors note that growth rates recorded in this trial are comparable with those of scallops grown away from salmon farms.