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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Does bivalve mollusc polyculture reduce marine fin fish farming environmental impact?

Published source details

Navarrete-Mier F., Sanz-Lázaro C. & Marín A. (2010) Does bivalve mollusc polyculture reduce marine fin fish farming environmental impact? Aquaculture, 306, 101-107


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Integrated aquaculture systems Sustainable Aquaculture

A study in the surroundings of a marine fish farm located in Águilas, SE Spain in 2008 (Navarrete-Mier et al., 2010) found evidence to indicate that oysters and mussels were not feeding on waste from fish farms when grown in polyculture systems. Between the beginning and end of the 90 day trial, oysters and mussels showed an increase in shell length of 85±54 mm and 152±45 mm, respectively. Analysis of stable isotopes content from the bivalves indicated no relationship between the trophic behaviour of the bivalves and the main input of organic matter from the fish farm (the feed). Growth of the bivalves was not affected by proximity to the fish farm. Oyster (Ostrea edulis) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were deployed along a distance transect running from 0 to 1800 m from fish cages containing cultured gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) for 3 months. The bivalves were placed at 15 m depth at 0, 25, 120, 300, 600 and 1800 m from the net cages to assess whether the fish farm influenced their development.