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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of dietary yeast cell wall β-glucans and MOS on performance, gut health, and salmon lice resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed sunflower and soybean meal

Published source details

Refstie S., Baeverfjord G., Seim R.R. & Elvebø O. (2010) Effects of dietary yeast cell wall β-glucans and MOS on performance, gut health, and salmon lice resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed sunflower and soybean meal. Aquaculture, 305, 109-116


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use an alternative protein source: plant-based Sustainable Aquaculture

A randomised, controlled study in Norway (Refstie et al., 2003) found that salmon, Salmo salar, fed diets containing a mix of fish-meal, wheat and low SGA potato protein concentrate grew at similar rates to salmon that were fed diets of fish meal and wheat. At the end of the experiment average final body weights ranged from 249-256g across all groups.  In addition, food intake and feed conversion ratio were not adversely affected. Over 84 days, groups of salmon were fed one of four experimental diets: 0% SGA potato protein concentrate (fish meal control diet) and increments of 7%, 14% and 21% SGA potato protein concentrate. Fish were fed using automated feeders under controlled environmental conditions. Growth rate was measured.

 

Use of probiotics and immunostimulants Sustainable Aquaculture

In 2009, a randomised, replicated, controlled study in Norway (Refstie et al., 2010) found that salmon, Salmo salar, fed a fish meal-based diet formulated with 14% soybean meal and 14% sunflower meal showed a 27% reduction in lice (Lepeophteirus salmonis and Caligus elongates) infection compared to the control diet. Adding beta-glucans to the experimental diet resulted in a further 28% reduction in infection rates whereas adding mannan oligosaccharides did not affect lice infection rates. It did improve gut function by preventing the salmon from developing soybean-induced enteritis and diarrhoea. Nine experimental diets were fed to salmon over a period of 69 to 71 feeding days. The basal diets were either based on pure fish meal or soybean and sunflower meal-soybean meal mixed with fish meal.