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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of Carnobacterium sp. as a probiotic for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

Published source details

Robertson P.A.W., O'Dowd C.O., Burrells C., Williams P. & Austin B. (2000) Use of Carnobacterium sp. as a probiotic for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum). Aquaculture, 185, 235-243


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Use of probiotics and immunostimulants Sustainable Aquaculture

In 1999, a replicated, controlled experiment in Scotland (Robertson et al., 2000) found that the survival rates of salmon fry, Salmo salar, increased when Carnobacterium bacteria sp. was used as a probiotic. After 14 days of diets with the probiotic, survival was improved when salmon fry were challenged with three different disease-causing bacteria, Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. Survival rates were 20%, 74% and 71% respectively compared to 0%, 23% and 42% in untreated controls. However, when exposed to the disease-causing bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum, salmon survival was not improved (46%) compared to the control group (42%). After 28 days of the diet with probiotic, improved survival was seen against all bacterial species tested compared to the control groups. 200 salmon fry were fed diets with or without the probiotic for 28 days. At seven day intervals during this 28 day period, a group of 25 salmon fry were exposed to four different disease-causing bacteria then monitored for a further 28 days.