Study

Reintroduction of the otter Lutra lutra to Weerribben and Wieden, Friesland, the Netherlands

  • Published source details Lammertsma D., Niewold F., Jansman H., Kuiters L., Koelewijn H.P., Perez Haro M., van Adrichem M., Boerwinkel M.-C. & Bovenschen J. (2006) Herintroductie van de otter: een succesverhaal? (Reintroduction of the otter: a success story). De Levende Natuur, 107, 42-46

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide mammals with escape routes from canals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Provide mammals with escape routes from canals

    A study in 2002–2005 in two wetland areas in the Netherlands (Lammertsma et al. 2006) found that providing mammals with escape or access routes from and into canals resulted in their use by Eurasian otters Lutra lutra. In 2002–2005, twenty-four animals, comprising a mix of wild-caught and captive-bred individuals, were released at two sites. In one of the areas, modifications to canal banks were made to aid entry and exit by otters to and from the water. Use of exits from canals was monitored by direct observation, observation of tracks in the snow, and identification of otter faeces.

  2. Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range

    A study in 2002–2005 in two wetland areas in the Netherlands (Lammertsma et al. 2006) found that following release of captive-bred animals, together with the release of some translocated individuals, over half of Eurasian otters Lutra lutra settled in their release areas and some successfully reproduced. After three weeks, 14 of 23 otters settled within their release areas, while two died and seven moved away from release areas. Three years after the first translocations, five female otters had successfully reproduced, producing nine young. At this time, the total population was 12 otters. In 2002, fifteen wild-caught otters were released at one site. At a second site, in 2004–2005, eight animals, comprising a mix of wild-caught and captive-bred individuals, were released. Before release, animals were fitted with radio-transmitters and DNA samples were taken. Following release, otters were monitored by radio-tracking and by collection of faeces, which was analysed to identify individuals.

  3. Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

    A study in 2002–2005 in two wetland areas in the Netherlands (Lammertsma et al. 2006) found that following translocation, and release of some captive-bred animals, most Eurasian otters Lutra lutra settled in their release areas, where successful breeding then occurred. After three weeks, 14 of 23 otters settled within their release areas, while two died and seven moved away from release areas. Three years after the first translocations, five female otters had successfully reproduced, producing nine young. At this time, the total population was 12 otters. In 2002, fifteen wild-caught otters were released at one site. At a second site, in 2004–2005, eight animals, comprising a mix of wild-caught and captive-bred individuals, were released. Before release, animals were fitted with radio-transmitters and DNA samples were taken. Following release, otters were monitored by radio-tracking and by collection of faeces, which was analysed to identify animals individually.

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust