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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Fate of nitrogen in cattle slurry following surface application or injection to grassland

Published source details

Thompson R.B., Ryden J.C. & Lockyer D.R. (1987) Fate of nitrogen in cattle slurry following surface application or injection to grassland. Journal of Soil Science, 38, 689-700


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil with formulated chemical compounds Soil Fertility

A replicated, controlled study in 1984-1985 on a loam soil in Berkshire, the UK (Thompson et al. 1987) found that adding a nitrification inhibitor to cattle slurry injected into pasture reduced nitrogen losses from 58 kg N/ha (slurry with no inhibitor) to 28 kg N/ha, and to 34 kg N/ha by spreading slurry on the surface. The effect was less pronounced in spring. The slurry treatments – surface application, injection into pasture, and injection with the nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin – were applied to ryegrass Lolium perenne in December and April at a rate of 80 t/ha. Slurry was poured into ploughed slots in the injection treatments. Each treatment was replicated four times.