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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Natural 13-C abundance and carbon storage in Danish soils under continuous silage maize

Published source details

Kristiansen S.M., Hansen E.M., Jensen L.S. & Christensen B.T. (2005) Natural 13-C abundance and carbon storage in Danish soils under continuous silage maize. European Journal of Agronomy, 22, 107-117


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil with fresh plant material or crop remains Soil Fertility

A controlled before-and-after, site comparison study from 1988 to 2002 on four sandy loam soils in Denmark (Kristiansen et al. 2005) found annual increases in soil carbon of 53-94 g/C/m2/year when maize Zea mays crop remains were incorporated into the soil, compared to 36-47 g/C/m2/year increases in three of four soil types receiving no amendment. Soil was collected from four arable fields (each with a different soil type) and placed outside in large, open-ended cylinders (0.7 m diameter x 0.5 m depth; number of cylinders not specified). After maize harvest, one cylinder for each soil type had chopped maize incorporated into the top 25 cm of soil. Remaining cylinders received no maize residue. Soil samples were taken every two-to-three years in spring to determine the amount of soil organic carbon.