Study

A comparison of nutrient losses following grassland improvement using two different techniques in an upland area of mid-Wales

  • Published source details Roberts A.M., Hudson J.A. & Roberts G. (1989) A comparison of nutrient losses following grassland improvement using two different techniques in an upland area of mid-Wales. Soil Use and Management, 5, 174-179.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Amend the soil with formulated chemical compounds

Action Link
Soil Fertility

Change tillage practices

Action Link
Soil Fertility
  1. Amend the soil with formulated chemical compounds

    A site comparison study in 1984-1987 on a peat overlaying clay soil in Plynlimon, UK (Roberts et al. 1989) found that about 10% of phosphorus from quick-release fertilizers (superphosphate) was lost through leaching, compared to slow-release fertilizers (basic slag) for which phosphorus levels in the soil were not affected. There were two sites, the first comprising 1.5 ha of soft rush Juncus effusus and purple moor grass Molinia caerulaea. This site was disc harrowed, and lime, basic slag, fertilizer and a nitrogenous fertilizer were applied. The second site (19.5 ha) contained purple moor grass and small areas of blanket mire Calluna vulgaris-Eriophorum vaginatum. Lime and phosphate fertilizer were applied at this site and grass seed was sown using the spike seeding method (a reduced tillage method whereby ground is spiked with a spike-aerator, then seed is broadcast over the soil). Soil and water samples were collected. Water flow and phosphorus levels were measured.

     

  2. Change tillage practices

    A site comparison study in 1984-1987 on peat overlaying clay soil in Plynlimon, UK (Roberts et al. 1989) found that disc harrowing can cause large quantities of nitrate to be released (18.2 mg N/l) compared to reduced tillage (less than 1 mg N/l). There were two sites: (1) 1.5 ha of soft rush Juncus effusus and purple moor grass Molinia caerulaea. The area was disc harrowed, and lime, basic slag, fertilizer and a nitrogenous fertilizer were applied; (2) 19.5 ha area with purple moor grass and small areas of blanket mire Calluna vulgaris-Eriophorum vaginatum. Lime and phosphate fertilizer were applied, then grass seed was sown using the spike seeding method (a reduced tillage method - ground is spiked with a spike-aerator, then seed is broadcast over the soil). Soil and water samples were collected. Water flow, nitrate, phosphorus and potassium levels were measured.

     

Output references
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