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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: No-tillage and manure applications increase aggregation and improve nutrient retention in a sandy-loam soil

Published source details

Jiao Y., Whalen J.K. & Hendershot W.H. (2006) No-tillage and manure applications increase aggregation and improve nutrient retention in a sandy-loam soil. Geoderma, 134, 24-33


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil with manures and agricultural composts Soil Fertility

A randomized, replicated experiment in 2003 on sandy-loam soil in Quebec, Canada (Jiao et al. 2006) found that the application of 30 and 45 Mg/ha/y of composted manure produced a higher proportion of large soil aggregates (35% and 41% respectively) than inorganic fertilizer application. There were four replicates of two tillage systems: conventional (tandem disk to 10 cm soil depth, mouldboard plough 20 cm) and no-tillage. Within these were maize Zea mays, soybean Glycine max/maize and maize/soybean rotations (in 20 x 24 m plots) and then within these were four fertilizer treatments: inorganic fertilizers, composted cattle manure at 30 or 45 Mg/ha/y, and the two mixed together (in 20 x 6 m areas of plots). Soil samples (to 10 cm depth) were taken after crop harvest. Soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and the size of aggregates were measured.

 

Use crop rotation Soil Fertility

A randomized, replicated experiment in 2003 on a sandy-loam soil in Quebec, Canada (Jiao et al. 2006) found similar sized soil aggregates in continuous maize Zea mays (1.89 mm) and in a soybean Glycine max-maize rotation (1.90 mm). There were four replicates of two tillage systems: conventional; and no-tillage. Within these were continuous maize, soybean -maize, and maize-soybean rotations (in 20 x 24 m plots). Within these were four fertilizer treatments: inorganic fertilizers, composted cattle manure, and the two mixed together (tested in 20 x 6 m plot sections). Soil samples (to 10 cm depth) were taken after crop harvest from the maize phase in October 2003. The size of soil aggregates was measured using a wet-sieving procedure. Soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were measured using finely ground soil samples.

 

Change tillage practices Soil Fertility

A randomized, replicated experiment in 2003 on a sandy-loam soil in Quebec, Canada (Jiao et al. 2006) found that adopting no-tillage increased soil aggregation (accumulation of soil particles) and nutrient retention under maize Zea mays production. The proportion of larger aggregates (soil particles larger than 2 mm) was greater under no-tillage (37.2%) compared to conventional tillage (31%). C, N and P concentrations were three, five and eight times higher (respectively) in smaller aggregates (0.25-0.053 mm) than larger aggregates (>2 mm). There were four replicates of two tillage systems: conventional (tandem disk 10 cm deep, mouldboard plough 20 cm) and no-tillage. Within these were maize Zea mays, soybean Glycine max/maize, maize/soybean rotations (20x 24 m). Within these were four fertilizer treatments: inorganic fertilizers, composted cattle manure, and the two mixed together (20 x 6 m plots). Soil samples (10 cm) were taken after crop harvest. Soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and size of aggregates were measured.