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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The impact of cultivation practice and wheelings on runoff generation and soil erosion on the South Downs: some experimental results using simulated rainfall

Published source details

Robinson D.A. & Naghizadeh R. (1992) The impact of cultivation practice and wheelings on runoff generation and soil erosion on the South Downs: some experimental results using simulated rainfall. Soil Use and Management, 8, 151-156


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Control traffic and traffic timing Soil Fertility

A randomized, replicated experiment in 1990-1991 on silt loam soil in Shoreham, UK (Robinson & Naghizadeh 1992) found lower runoff in uncompacted ground (3 l/h) compared to compacted ground in tractor wheelings (8 l/h). There were two sites with 100 x 18 m cultivated plots (number not specified). Plots had three different cultivation practices (shallow cultivation, conventional deep cultivation, and deep cultivation followed by heavy rolling). A rainfall simulator was used to test runoff, with each treatment subjected to three simulated rainfall events, lasting one hour at 42.5 mm/h. Runoff and eroded soil was caught in a trap immediately downslope of the rainfall simulator. The volume of runoff and weight of eroded soil were measured.

 

Change tillage practices Soil Fertility

A randomized replicated experiment in 1990-1991 on a calcareous silt loam soil in Shoreham, England, UK (Robinson & Naghizadeh, 1992) found that shallow cultivation reduces the amount of soil lost (4.53 g/h on average) and the amount of runoff (0.82 l/h on average) during heavier rainfall events compared to conventionally cultivated and rolled (with a heavy roller) land (25.54 g/h, 5.87 l/h on average, respectively). There were two sites with cultivated plots (number not specified), which were 100 x 18 m. Plots had three different cultivation practices (shallow cultivation, conventional deep cultivation, and deep cultivation followed by heavy rolling). A rainfall simulator was used, with each treatment subjected to three simulated rainfall events, lasting one hour at 42.5 mm/h. Runoff and eroded soil was caught in a trap in the slope immediately below the rainfall simulator. The volume of runoff and weight of eroded soil were measured.