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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of codling moth management on orchard arthropods

Published source details

Simon S., Defrance H. & Sauphanor B. (2007) Effect of codling moth management on orchard arthropods. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 122, 340-348


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Convert to organic farming Natural Pest Control

A site comparison study in Drôme, France (Simon et al. 2007) reported more insect, spider and mite natural enemies in apple Malus domestica trees in an organic orchard (132 individuals in 2002, 181 in 2003) than in a conventional orchard (70 and 125 individuals). However, in 2001, 35 and 43 individuals were found in the organic and conventional orchards, respectively. In the grass beneath trees, natural enemies were typically more common in the organic than the conventional orchard. The combined number of pest rosy apple aphid Dysaphis plantaginea, green apple aphid Aphis pomi and European red mite Panonychus ulmi in trees totalled 15,568 and 3,350 individuals in organic orchards (2002 and 2003), compared with 2,771 and 1,924 in the conventional orchard. In 2001, 94 and 237 pests were found in the organic and conventional orchards, respectively. Fruit damage from codling moth Cydia pomonella averaged 9.2% and 1.3% in the organic and conventional orchards, respectively. An organic orchard (0.25 ha) receiving granulosis virus and mineral fungicide applications was compared with a conventional orchard (0.2 ha) receiving insecticides, fungicides and herbicides. Treatments took place for two years before the study began. Invertebrates in trees were sampled by beating 50 branches per orchard.