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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of some agroforestry practices on the temporal structures of nematodes in western Kenya

Published source details

Kandji S.T., Ogol C.K.P.O. & Albrecht A. (2002) Influence of some agroforestry practices on the temporal structures of nematodes in western Kenya. European Journal of Soil Biology, 38, 197-203


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant new hedges Natural Pest Control

A randomised, replicated, controlled study in 1998-1999 on a farm in western Kenya (Kandji et al. 2002) found two nematode (Nematoda) genera which parasitise plants were more numerous in plots with vs. plots without hedges of calliandra Calliandra calothyrsus and Napier grass Pennisetum purpureum (averaging 1,827-3,460 vs. 960-2,973 nematodes/l soil) during the cultivation period. Three nematode genera had similar numbers in plots with and without hedges (0-20 vs. 7-33 nematodes/l soil)during the cultivation period. Prior to cultivation, fallow plots with calliandra hedges had fewer individuals of five nematode genera and more individuals of two genera compared to fallows without hedges, but differences were small. There were four replicates of each treatment in 15 x 12 m plots. A year before sampling, hedges of one Napier grass and one calliandra row (50 cm apart) were planted on the upper and lower edges of the plots. Crotalaria Crotalaria grahamiana fallows were established in plots in June 1998 and cultivation began in May 1999, when the crotalaria fallow was cut and sown with maize Zea mays and beans Phaseolus sp.. Soil samples were taken every two months from September 1998 until September 1999.