Study

Adult monitoring improves control of the flavescence doree leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus in Gironde (France) while using less pesticide!

  • Published source details van Helden M., Fulchin E., Verpy A., Gil F. & Garcia C. (2011) Adult monitoring improves control of the flavescence doree leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus in Gironde (France) while using less pesticide!. IOBC/WPRS Bulletin, 67, 9-16.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use pesticides only when pests or crop damage reach threshold levels

Action Link
Natural Pest Control
  1. Use pesticides only when pests or crop damage reach threshold levels

    A trial in 2008-2009 in Aquitaine, France (van Helden et al. 2011) during flavescence dorée outbreaks reported that a threshold-based spraying regime controlled this disease (caused by Candidatus Phytoplasma vitis bacteria) in two grape Vitis vinifera vineyard landscapes, as the disease carrying pest (the American grapevine leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus) was very scarce after the first insecticidal spray. In one landscape, the threshold-based regime resulted in 4,299 sprayings compared to an estimated 14,919 sprayings had a conventional approach been taken. Spraying frequency was reduced by 54-72% across the two landscapes, and spraying costs fell by €19-29/ha. Compared to the conventional approach of three insecticide applications, the threshold-based regime comprised one application, followed by a second spray if leafhopper abundance exceeded 3 adults/trap. One yellow delta trap was set up per 30 ha (costing approximately €3/ha) and checked weekly. The threshold-based regime used circular buffers (with a 2 km radius) to define spraying areas around infected sites whereas, traditionally, entire districts were sprayed under the conventional regime. The threshold-based spraying regime was applied in two landscapes, and compared with theoretical estimates for insecticide use under the conventional regime. Effects on natural enemies were not presented and the insecticide type was not specified.

Output references
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