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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Role of cropping pattern for the management of insect pests of safflower, Carthamus tinctorius L

Published source details

Hanumantharaya L., Venkateshalu ., Kubasad V.S. & Raju S.G. (2008) Role of cropping pattern for the management of insect pests of safflower, Carthamus tinctorius L. 7th International Safflower Conference, Wagga Wagga, Australia, 1-4.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Grow non-crop plants that produce chemicals that attract natural enemies Natural Pest Control

A replicated, randomised, controlled study in 2006-2007 in Karnataka, India (Hanumantharaya et al. 2008) found more natural predators, including lacewing (Neuroptera) eggs and ladybirds (Coccinellidae), in safflower Carthamus tinctorious intercropped with 7-13% coriander Coriandrum sativum (6.0-7.6 lacewing eggs and 1.0-1.4 ladybirds/plant) than in safflower monoculture (4.8 and 0.8, respectively). Cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera damage was lowest in intercropped plots of 13% and 10% coriander (16-17% of safflower capsules damaged) and greatest in safflower monoculture plots (21% damaged). Safflower yield was greater (0.92-1.1 t/ha) in intercropped plots (at all densities of coriander) than in monoculture plots (0.86 t/ha). The experiment comprised four treatments (safflower mixed with coriander at 5%, 7%, 10% and 13% of sowing seed volume) and a safflower monoculture control, replicated three times.