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Individual study: Impact of multi-year cropping regimes on Solanum tuberosum tuber yields in the presence of Pratylenchus penetrans and Verticillium dahliae

Published source details

Chen J., Bird G.W. & Mather R.L. (1995) Impact of multi-year cropping regimes on Solanum tuberosum tuber yields in the presence of Pratylenchus penetrans and Verticillium dahliae. Journal of Nematology, 27, 654-660


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use crop rotation in potato farming systems Natural Pest Control

A randomised, replicated, controlled study in 1989-1991 in Michigan, USA (Chen et al. 1995) found that potato Solanum tuberosum yield was significantly higher in fields that had grown alfalfa Medicago sativa (32.3 t/ha) or yellow sweet clover Melilotus officinalis (33.8 t/ha) in the previous two years than fields that had grown potatoes for three years continuously (22.8 t/ha). Yield of potato in rotation with one year of rye Secale cereale, one or two years of maize Zea mays and one or two years of a sorghum hybrid Sorghum halepense x sudanense was not significantly different to continuous potato. Populations of wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae and root lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans were not affected by crop rotations. The experiment used five replicates of ten rotation treatments. Plots were 15 m long and four crop-rows wide. Crop management followed local recommendations for conventional potato production. Wilt fungus and root lesion nematode were sampled at the beginning, middle and end of each growing season using eight to twelve 600 cm³ soil cores in each plot.