Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Colorado potato beetle response to soil amendments: a case in support of the mineral balance hypothesis?

Published source details

Alyokhin A., Porter G., Groden E. & Drummond F. (2005) Colorado potato beetle response to soil amendments: a case in support of the mineral balance hypothesis? Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 109, 234-244


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use crop rotation in potato farming systems Natural Pest Control

A randomised, replicated study in 1999-2003 in Maine, USA (Alyokhin et al. 2005) found that numbers of Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata larvae were not significantly different between a two-year rotation (potato Solanum tuberosum-barley Hordeum vulgare), an intensive four-year rotation (potato-soybean Glycine max-potato-barley) and an integrated four-year rotation (potato-soybean-barley-alfalfa Medicago sativa/timothy Phleum pratense) except in the final year of the experiment when the two-year rotation had significantly more large larvae (1.72 larvae/plant), compared to the integrated four-year rotation (1.51) and the intensive four-year rotation (1.45). The experiment used 96 plots, each 41 x 14.6 m, split into four blocks. Rotation treatments were randomised within each block. Imidacloprid was used for pest control on all plots as part of an integrated system, with thresholds for spraying of one adult, eight small larvae or three large larvae/plant.