Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Conservation practice could benefit from routine testing and publication of management outcomes

Published source details

Sutherland W.J., Mitchell R, Walsh J., Amano T., Ausden M., Beebee T.J.C., Bullock D., Daniels M., Deutsch J., Griffiths R.A., Prior S. V., Whitten T. & Dicks L.V. (2013) Conservation practice could benefit from routine testing and publication of management outcomes. Conservation Evidence, 10, 1-3

Summary

Effective conservation requires a step change in the way practitioners can contribute to science and can have access to research outputs. The journal Conservation Evidence was established in 2004 to help practitioners surmount several obstacles they face when attempting to document the effects of their conservation actions scientifically. It is easily and freely accessible online. It is free to publish in and it enables global communication of the effects of practical trials and experiments, which are virtually impossible to get published in most scientific journals. The driving force behind Conservation Evidence is the need to generate and share scientific information about the effects of interventions.