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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Inbreeding and loss of genetic variation in a reintroduced population of Mauritius kestrel

Published source details

Ewing S.R., Nager R.G., Nicoll M.A.C., Jones C. G. & Keller L.F. (2008) Inbreeding and loss of genetic variation in a reintroduced population of Mauritius kestrel. Conservation Biology, 22, 395-404


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Can captive breeding have deleterious effects on individual fitness? Bird Conservation

A study of a population of Mauritius kestrels Falco punctatus in eastern Mauritius (Ewing et al. 2008) found that the population had grown from 12 individuals in 1987 to a minimum of 154 by 2002. Over this time, the degree of inbreeding increased by 2.6% each generation and by 2002, 25% of pairs were either closely or moderately related. Over this period 1.6% of genetic diversity was lost each generation. Effects on reproduction or survival were not monitored.