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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful captive breeding and possible release of brown goshawks Accipiter fasciatus in Australia

Published source details

Olsen J. & Olsen P. (1981) Natural breeding of Accipiter fasciatus in captivity. Raptor Research, 15, 53-57


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations of raptors Bird Conservation

A small study from Canberra, Australia (Olsen & Olsen 1981), found that a pair of wild-caught brown goshawks, Accipiter fasciatus, failed to breed in captivity in 1975 (two years after being caught). However, following transfer to a smaller outdoor cage (from an indoor room with no windows) and the falconry training of the male, the pair did breed successfully each year from 1976-9, including a second brood in 1978. A total of 17 eggs were laid and 15 chicks survived and were released, discussed in ‘Release captive bred individuals’.

 

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of raptors Bird Conservation

A replicated study from Canberra, Australia (Olsen & Olsen 1981), found that, only 1 of 15 captive-bred brown goshawk Accipiter fasciatus chicks released into a suburban habitat between 1976 and 1979 was recovered: a male hit by a car 960 km away and nine months after release. The authors note that all young were very secretive after release. Young were hacked by being fed for between two weeks and two months after release. This study is also discussed in ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’.