Study

Effectiveness of social stimuli in attracting Laysan albatross to new potential nesting sites

  • Published source details Podolsky R.H. (1990) Effectiveness of social stimuli in attracting Laysan albatross to new potential nesting sites. The Auk, 107, 119-124.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas

    A controlled study on Kauai, Hawaii, USA, between December 1982 and April 1983 (Podolsky 1990) found that Laysan albatrosses Phoebastria immutabilis were more likely to land in a study site with albatross decoys on days when albatross vocalisations were also played, than on days when vocalisations were not played or than at a control site with neither decoys nor vocalisations (8.2% of 1,053 flying albatrosses landing when vocalisations were playing vs. 5.2% of 1,300 without vocalisations and 1.8% of 877 at the control site). Albatrosses were also more likely to land close to speakers when vocalisations were playing, compared to when they were turned off (76% of the 97 closest landings when speakers were on vs. 24% when they were off). Each study plot had a speaker surrounded by six decoys. The effect of the decoys in attracting albatrosses is discussed in ‘Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas’.

     

  2. Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas

    A controlled study in mixed coastal habitats on Kauai, Hawaii, USA, between December 1982 and April 1983 (Podolsky 1990) found that Laysan albatrosses Phoebastria immutabilis (formerly Diomedea immutabilis) were more likely to land in a study site with albatross decoys than at a control site without decoys (5.2% of 1,300 flying albatrosses landing at the experimental site vs. 1.8% of 877 at the control site). In addition, albatrosses landed closer to decoys than would be expected by random. Three-dimensional models of albatross pointing towards the sky attracted more albatrosses to within 3 m than two-dimensional models and paired models attracted more birds than single models. Six decoys were placed (either singly or in pairs) in a 10 m circle at each study plot. This study also describes the effect of playing albatross vocalisations on albatross landings, discussed in ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’, but does not provide any data on breeding.

     

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust