Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Models and vocalisation playback encourage Laysan albatrosses Phoebastria immutabilis to land at a site on Kauai, Hawaii, USA

Published source details

Podolsky R.H. (1990) Effectiveness of Social Stimuli in Attracting Laysan Albatross to New Potential Nesting Sites. The Auk, 107, 119-124


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A controlled study on Kauai, Hawaii, USA, between December 1982 and April 1983 (Podolsky 1990) found that Laysan albatrosses Phoebastria immutabilis were more likely to land in a study site with albatross decoys on days when albatross vocalisations were also played, than on days when vocalisations were not played or than at a control site with neither decoys nor vocalisations (8.2% of 1,053 flying albatrosses landing when vocalisations were playing vs. 5.2% of 1,300 without vocalisations and 1.8% of 877 at the control site). Albatrosses were also more likely to land close to speakers when vocalisations were playing, compared to when they were turned off (76% of the 97 closest landings when speakers were on vs. 24% when they were off). Each study plot had a speaker surrounded by six decoys. The effect of the decoys in attracting albatrosses is discussed in ‘Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas’.

 

Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A controlled study in mixed coastal habitats on Kauai, Hawaii, USA, between December 1982 and April 1983 (Podolsky 1990) found that Laysan albatrosses Phoebastria immutabilis (formerly Diomedea immutabilis) were more likely to land in a study site with albatross decoys than at a control site without decoys (5.2% of 1,300 flying albatrosses landing at the experimental site vs. 1.8% of 877 at the control site). In addition, albatrosses landed closer to decoys than would be expected by random. Three-dimensional models of albatross pointing towards the sky attracted more albatrosses to within 3 m than two-dimensional models and paired models attracted more birds than single models. Six decoys were placed (either singly or in pairs) in a 10 m circle at each study plot. This study also describes the effect of playing albatross vocalisations on albatross landings, discussed in ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’, but does not provide any data on breeding.