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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful breeding of ospreys Pandion haliaetus translocated to an urban area in Minnesota, USA

Published source details

Martell M.S., Englund J.V. & Tordoff H.B. (2002) An urban osprey population established by translocation. Journal of Raptor Research, 36, 91-96


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate raptors Bird Conservation

A replicated study, reviewing an osprey Pandion haliaetus translocation programme in the Twin Cities urban area of Minnesota, USA (Martell et al. 2002), reported that a total of 143 juvenile ospreys were released by hacking (see ‘Release captive-bred individuals’) between 1986 and 1995. Breeding was first attempted in the area in 1986, with the first successful nesting in 1988. By the end of 2000, 131 nesting attempts were recorded, with 69% of them successful, producing 194 chicks in total (with an average of 1.6 fledglings/nest or 2.2 fledglings/successful nest). A small number of individuals and sites were responsible for a disproportionate number of chicks, with 85% of successful nest sites being in parks or backyards and 15% in industrial areas. This study is also described in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for raptors Bird Conservation

A replicated study reviewing an osprey Pandion haliaetus translocation programme in an urban area of Minnesota, USA (Martell et al. 2002), found that all but three of 26 nest sites used by 143 translocated ospreys and their young were artificial nesting platforms provided for the birds. Of these, 20 nests were productive, with only one not being situated on a nesting platform. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Translocate individuals’.