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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Provision of bird perches increases native woody species seedling establishment in a former pine plantation at São Francisco de Paula, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Published source details

Zanini L. & Ganade G. (2005) Restoration of Araucaria forest: the role of perches, pioneer vegetation, and soil fertility. Restoration Ecology, 13, 507-514


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Build bird-perches to enhance natural seed dispersal Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2001-2002 in a degraded subtropical Araucaria forest in Brazil (Zanini & Ganade 2005) found that building bird perches increased species richness and abundance of new seedlings. Species richness (perches: 0.6-2.0; no perch: 0.2-0.8/m2) and abundance (perches: 0.7-2.7; no perches: 0.2-1.7) were higher under perches. Data were collected in 2002 in four pairs of perch and control plots (1 × 1 m) in each of 10 blocks randomly located inside a 2 ha area. Perches were 2 m tall with a 16 cm diameter pole and were placed in the centre of each perch plot.

 

Use fertilizer Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2001-2002 in subtropical Araucaria forest in Brazil (3) found no effect of fertilizing on species richness and abundance of new tree seedlings. Species richness (fertilized: 0.2-1.9; unfertilized: 0.4-2.0/m2) and abundance (fertilized: 0.2-2.7; unfertilized: 0.4-2.5/m2) were similar between treatments. Data were collected in 2002 in two fertilized (nitrogen: 40 kg/ha; phosphorus: 130 kg/ha; potassium: 30 kg/ha) and two unfertilized plots (3 × 3 m) in each of ten blocks randomly located inside a 2 ha area.

 

Use clearcutting to increase understory diversity Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2001-2002 in subtropical Araucaria forest in Brazil (Zanini & Ganade 2005) found that clearcutting and complete vegetation removal increased species richness and abundance of new seedlings. Species richness/m2 (clearcut: 0.7-2.0; uncut: 0.2-0.6) and abundance (clearcut: 0.8-2.6; uncut: 0.2-0.7) were higher in removal than uncut plots. Data were collected in 2002 in two removal (all plants and organic material removed in 2001) and two uncut plots (3 × 3 m) in each of 10 blocks randomly located inside a 2 ha area.