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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The restoration of the Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus population

Published source details

Jones C.G., Heck W. & Lewis R.E. (1996) The restoration of the Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus population. Ibis, 137, S173-S180


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary food for raptors to increase reproductive success Bird Conservation

A review of an integrated conservation programme for the endangered Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus from 1973-1994 in montane forest habitat and a captive breeding centre in Black River, Mauritius (Jones et al. 1996) found that the provision of supplementary food had uncertain effects on breeding productivity. Fed birds produced more eggs, but did not necessarily fledge more chicks and, in some cases, fledged fewer. The authors speculate that Mauritius kestrels are less able to tolerate fur and feathers than other kestrels because young kestrels are fed primarily on Day geckos Phelsuma spp and roughage causes digestive prroblems. Captive-bred birds and hacked birds were fed mice and day-old chicks.

 

Foster eggs or chicks of raptors with wild conspecifics Bird Conservation

A 1995 update (Jones et al. 1996) of the same conservation programme studied in (5), found that fostering of hand-reared nestlings had a probability of surviving to independence. A total of 331 birds were released into various sites from 1984-1985 and 1993-1994 of which 78% became independent and 61% survived their first winter. Of these, 105 young were placed into 46 different broods (5-18 day old nestlings were placed in the nests of wild pairs that had been incubating for > 2 weeks containing 1-5 other nestlings). Overall, 96 (91%) were fledged and 78 (81%) of these survived to independence. A total of 44 wild breeding pairs successfully raised at least one young to independence. The remainder of the released young were hacked in nestboxes. At the end of the 1993-1994 breeding season, the natural population had recovered to 222-286 birds (containing at least 56 breeding pairs and 40-70 non-breeding birds).

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for falcons Bird Conservation

A study of an integrated conservation programme for the endangered Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus from 1973-1994 in montane forest habitat and a captive breeding centre in Black River, Mauritius (Jones et al. 1996) found that nestboxes in areas where natural nest sites were limited were used by released birds, with 90% of 105 documented nesting attempts, during 1988-1989 and 1993-1994, occurring in nestboxes. In the 1993-1994 breeding season, 49% of all monitored wild pairs used nestboxes and several returned to nest in the same ones.