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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A review of the efficacy of translocation as a tool for mitigating development threats to great crested newts Triturus cristatus in England

Published source details

Edgar P.W., Griffiths R.A. & Foster J.P. (2005) Evaluation of translocation as a tool for mitigating development threats to great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) in England, 1990-2001. Biological Conservation, 122, 1990-2001


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Legal protection of species Amphibian Conservation

A review from 1990 to 2001 of great crested newt Triturus cristatus mitigation licences in England, UK (Edgar, Griffiths & Foster 2005) found that the number issued had increased. Licences issued increased from three in 1990 to 153 in 2000 and 97 in 2001. Of the 737 licences examined, only 45% contained reporting (‘return’) documents, a condition of the licence. Great crested newts are a European Protected Species. Licences are therefore issued for certain activities that involve mitigation and/or compensation for the impacts of activities such as development. Licensing information collected by the governmental licensing authorities (1990–2000: English Nature; 2000–2001: Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) was analysed.

 

Translocate great crested newts Amphibian Conservation

In an update of previous reviews (May 1996, Oldham & Humphries 2000), a review of 72 great crested newt Triturus cristatus translocation projects carried out to mitigate against development in 1990–2001 in England, UK (Edgar, Griffiths & Foster 2005) found that where follow-up monitoring was conducted, there was evidence of breeding at over half of sites one-year post-development (56%). However, projects did not provide data to compare numbers before and after translocation or to determine whether sustainable populations were established. Only 49% of projects monitored populations, most for two years or less. The average number of newts translocated per project declined significantly from 358 in 1990–1994 to 172 in 1995–2001. Most translocations were to areas within or adjacent to the development site (<500 m). There was a net loss in overall area of aquatic habitat. Licensing information collected by the governmental licensing authorities was analysed and a questionnaire survey sent out to a sample of 153 mitigation projects (47% provided data). Of 737 licensed projects on file, 55% contained no report of the work undertaken, although it is a condition of the licence.