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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Wetting-up ditches in arable and pastoral land results in greater numbers of emergent insects in Leicestershire, UK

Published source details

Aquilina R., Williams P. & Nicolet P. (2007) Effect of wetting-up ditches on emergent insect numbers. Aspects of Applied Biology, 81, 261-262


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manage ditches to benefit wildlife Farmland Conservation

A replicated controlled study of 32 ditches in arable and pastoral land in 2005 in Leicestershire, UK (Aquilina et al. 2007) (same study as (Defra 2007)) found that bunded ditches, which dammed water, had significantly greater invertebrate biomass than controls (dry weight: 10 g/m² vs 4 g/m²). Invertebrate families other than flies (Diptera) showed a more mixed response to bunding. Ditches were bunded (small dams placed across ditches) and slightly widened in 5-20 m lengths, with equal length control sections approximately 50 m upstream. Five insect emergence traps (0.5 mm mesh, surface area 0.1 m²) were spaced along each section. Samples were collected every two weeks (April-August 2005), invertebrates identified to family and recorded as biomass estimates.

 

Raise water levels in ditches or grassland Farmland Conservation

A replicated controlled study of 32 ditches in arable and pastoral land in 2005 in Leicestershire, UK (Aquilina et al. 2007) (same study as (Defra 2007)) found that bunded ditches, which dammed water, had significantly greater invertebrate biomass than controls (dry weight: 10 g/m² vs 4 g/m²).  Invertebrate families other than flies (Diptera) showed a more mixed response to bunding.  Ditches were bunded (small dams placed across ditches) and slightly widened in 5-20 m lengths, with equal length control sections approximately 50 m upstream.  Five insect emergence traps (0.5 mm mesh, surface area 0.1 m²) were spaced along each section.  Samples were collected every two weeks (April-August 2005), invertebrates identified to family and recorded as biomass estimates.