Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Adoption of a juvenile by breeding Spanish imperial eagles during the postfledging period

Published source details

Gonzalez J.L., Heredia B., González L.M. & Alonso N. (1986) Adoption of a juvenile by breeding Spanish imperial eagles during the postfledging period. Raptor Research, 20, 77-78


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Foster eggs or chicks of raptors with wild conspecifics Bird Conservation

A small study in wetlands in the Doñana National Park, southern Spain, in summer 1984 (Gonzales et al. 1986), found that an orphaned fledgling Spanish imperial eagle Aquila adalberti was successfully supported by foster parents. The orphan was found after leaving the nest (aged approximately 91 days) and initially taken into captivity before being released, with some supplementary food, into the home range of a family with two young of approximately the same age (which had left the nest but which were still dependent on parental feeding). All young were fed and chased by parents at approximately the same frequency, suggesting the foster fledgling had been accepted. This study also discusses other interventions, in ‘Add perches to electricity pylons to reduce electrocution’, ‘Bury or isolate power lines’, ‘Use signs and access restrictions to reduce disturbance at nest sites’ and ‘Remove/treat endoparasites’.

 

Artificially incubate and hand-rear raptors in captivity Bird Conservation

A small study in wetlands in the Doñana National Park, southern Spain, in summer 1984 (Gonzalez et al. 1986), found that an orphaned fledgling Spanish imperial eagle Aquila adalberti (91 days old) increased in weight by 1,250 g in nine days in captivity (growing from 2,300 g to 3,550 g). The chick was then successfully released and ‘adopted’ by a foster pair, discussed in ‘Foster eggs or chicks with wild conspecifics’.