Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful relocation of black-crowned night heron Nycticorax nycticorax colony in California, USA

Published source details

Crouch S., Paquette C. & Vilas D. (2002) Relocation of a large black-crowned night heron colony in southern California. Waterbirds, 25, 474-478


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate herons, storks and ibises Bird Conservation

A before-and-after trial at a coastal site in Long Beach, California, USA (Crouch et al. 2002), found that 423 pairs of black-crowned night herons Nycticorax nycticorax successfully fledged 1,128 chicks in 2000, following the translocation of the colony beginning in 1999. The former colony was threatened by port development, so 50 mature trees were relocated 2 km away near approximately 70 existing trees. In addition, vocalisations of the original colony were played, decoys placed in the trees and public access stopped. Before the translocation, the old colony held up to 500 pairs of herons.

 

Use signs and access restrictions to reduce disturbance at nest sites Bird Conservation

A before-and-after trial at a coastal site in Long Beach, California, USA (Crouch et al. 2002), reported the successful translocation of a black-crowned night heron Nycticorax nycticorax colony to a site where public access was stopped. This study is discussed in ‘Translocate individuals’.

 

Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A before-and-after trial at a coastal site in Long Beach, California, USA (Crouch et al. 2002), reported the successful translocation of a black-crowned night heron Nycticorax nycticorax colony using (amongst other interventions) vocalisations of the original colony. This study is discussed in ‘Translocate individuals’.

 

Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A before-and-after trial at a coastal site in Long Beach, California, USA (Crouch et al. 2002), reported the successful translocation of a black-crowned night heron Nycticorax nycticorax colony using (amongst other interventions) decoys to attract birds. This study is discussed in ‘Translocate individuals’.