Study

Population dynamics and conservation of the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) on the edge of its range

  • Published source details Berglind S.Å. (2005) Population dynamics and conservation of the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) on the edge of its range. PhD. Uppsala Universitet.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Clear or open patches in forests

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Disturb soil/sediment surface

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Clear or open patches in forests

    A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1988–2004 in sandy pine heath in south-central Sweden (Berglind 2005) found that in areas where trees were cleared and sand patches created, sand lizards Lacerta agilis colonized, abundance then declined, but then increased after more clearings were created. Sand lizards gradually colonized the newly created clearings and eventually abandoned unmanaged habitat after 16 years (see original paper). During the first 10 years after clearing and sand patch creation, female sand lizard abundance declined (9–11%) but increased annually (11–19%) after a second, larger-scale clearing and sand patch creation programme was carried out. In particular, subadult lizard abundance increased more after the second creation programme (after first programme <10% increase; after second programme >150% increase in relative population size). Restoration was first carried out in 1988 and 1992 when nine 1–2 ha lizard-appropriate habitat patches in two sites were managed by tree felling and creating sand patches. A second restoration programme took place in the same two sites in 1999 and 2001, creating 18 habitat patches (10 ha each) by tree felling, soil scarification and excavating 7–11 sand patches/site (100–200 m2 patches). Sand lizards were monitored from May–September in 1988–2004 by hand capture in unmanaged and managed areas of the sites.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

  2. Disturb soil/sediment surface

    A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1988–2004 in sandy pine heath in south-central Sweden (Berglind 2005) found where sand patches were created through disturbing the soil surface in areas where trees were cleared, sand lizards Lacerta agilis colonized, abundance then declined, but then increased after more sand patches in further clearings were created. After soil scarification and tree felling, sand lizards gradually colonized newly created habitat patches and eventually abandoned unmanaged habitat after 16 years (see original paper). During the first 10 years after sand patch creation, female sand lizard abundance declined (9–11%) but increased annually (11–19%) after a second, larger-scale clearing and sand patch creation programme was carried out. In particular, subadult lizard abundance increased more after the second creation programme (after first programme <10% increase; after second programme >150% increase in relative population size). Restoration was first carried out in 1988 and 1992 when nine 1–2 ha lizard-appropriate habitat patches in two sites were managed by tree felling and creating sand patches. A second restoration programme took place in the same two sites in 1999 and 2001, creating eighteen 10 ha habitat patches by tree felling, soil scarification and excavating 7–11 100–200 m2 sand patches/site. Sand lizards were monitored from May–September in 1988–2004 by hand capture in unmanaged and managed areas of the sites.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

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