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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Reintroduction of swift foxes Vulpes velox to Grassland National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada

Published source details

Smeeton C. & Weagle K. (2000) The reintroduction of the swift fox Vulpes velox to south central Saskatchewan, Canada. Oryx, 34, 171-179


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of studies in 1989–1991 in prairie sites in Canada and the USA (Smeeton & Weagle 2000) found that following release, captive-bred swift foxes Vulpes velox had lower survival rates than did translocated, wild-caught swift foxes. Over an unspecified time period, 59% of wild-caught translocated swift foxes survived while three of 41 (7%) captive-bred swift foxes survived after release. In 1989–1991, thirty-three wild-caught, adult foxes and 41 captive-bred foxes, born the previous year, were released in the spring. Methods used for monitoring animals were unclear.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of studies in 1989–1991 in prairie sites in Canada and the USA (Smeeton & Weagle 2000) found that following release, translocated wild-caught swift foxes Vulpes velox had higher survival rates than did captive-bred released swift foxes. Over an unspecified time period, 59% of wild-caught translocated swift foxes survived while three of 41 (7%) released captive-bred swift foxes survived. In 1989–1991, thirty-three wild-caught, adult foxes and 41 captive-bred foxes, born the previous year, were released in the spring. Methods used for monitoring animals were unclear from the review.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)