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Individual study: Meta-analysis shows that predator removal does not appear to increase nesting success in dabbling ducks Anas spp. in Prairie Pothole Region of North America, but that fences may do

Published source details

Beauchamp W.D., Nudds T.D. & Clark R.G. (1996) Duck nest success declines with and without predator management. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 60, 258-264


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Physically protect nests from predators using non-electric fencing Bird Conservation

A 1996 meta-analysis of 58 studies from the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA and Canada between 1935 and 1992 (Beauchamp et al. 1996) found that the nesting success of dabbling ducks Anas spp. declined over the study period, and that the rate of this decline did not differ between fenced sites and sites with no predator control. However, the intercept of the regression slope did differ significantly; with nesting success being higher in fenced sites than in sites without management or where predators were removed. There was no difference between fenced and island sites.

A 1996 meta-analysis of 58 studies from the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA and Canada between 1935 and 1992 (2) found that the nesting success of dabbling ducks Anas spp. declined over the study period, and that the rate of this decline did not differ between fenced sites and sites with no predator control. However, the intercept of the regression slope did differ significantly; with nesting success being higher in fenced sites than in sites without management or where predators were removed. There was no difference between fenced and island sites.

A 1996 meta-analysis of 58 studies from the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA and Canada between 1935 and 1992 (2) found that the nesting success of dabbling ducks Anas spp. declined over the study period, and that the rate of this decline did not differ between fenced sites and sites with no predator control. However, the intercept of the regression slope did differ significantly; with nesting success being higher in fenced sites than in sites without management or where predators were removed. There was no difference between fenced and island sites.

Control predators not on islands for wildfowl Bird Conservation

A 1996 meta-analysis of 58 studies from the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA and Canada between 1935 and 1992 (Beauchamp et al. 1996) found that the nesting success of dabbling ducks Anas spp. did not differ significantly between sites where predator removal was practiced and those without removal. In addition, there was a significant decline in nesting success over the study period, but the rate of this decline did not differ between sites with predator removal and those without. Two of the studies analysed are described above (Balser et al. 1968, Duebbert & Kantrud 1974).