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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Release of captive-produced peregrine falcons in the eastern United States, 1975-1979

Published source details

Barclay J.H. (1980) Release of captive-produced peregrine falcons in the eastern United States, 1975-1979.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of raptors Bird Conservation

A replicated study from the eastern USA between 1975 and 1979 (Barclay 1980) found that 72% of 204 captive-bred peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus that were hacked in artificial and natural sites survived to independence, with three groups of releases being ‘adopted’ by wild adults. Success was higher for birds released at artificial sites (i.e. from a tower), compared to natural sites (i.e. from cliffs), mainly because of high rates of predation by great horned owls Bubo virginianus at cliffs. Most birds stayed in the release area and first year survival appears comparable with wild birds. In 1979, three pairs consisting of released birds were known.