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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Supplemental feeding regimes for Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus at two feeding stations established in the Negev Desert, Israel

Published source details

Meretsky V.J. & Mannan R.W. (1999) Supplemental feeding regimes for Egyptian vultures in the Negev Desert, Israel. Journal of Wildlife Management, 63, 107-115


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary food for vultures to increase reproductive success Bird Conservation

A study in the Negev Desert, Israel, in April-August of 1989 and 1990 (Meretsky & Mannan 1999) found that a large (20-350 kg), irregularly supplied (twice a month) feeding station did not provided sufficient regular food for Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus feeding young, whereas a feeding station supplied daily with 5-10 kg of chicken did. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase reproductive success’.

 

Provide supplementary food for vultures to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A study in the Negev Desert, Israel, in April-August of 1989 and 1990 (Meretsky & Mannan 1999) found that adult Egyptian vultures Neophron percnopterus were able to dominate a feeding station supplied daily with 5-10 kg of chicken, but not a station supplied approximately twice a month with large amounts (20-350 kg) of meat. Peak numbers of vultures were higher at the irregularly-stocked station (30-40 vultures present at once vs. 20-30) but they were sometimes excluded by mammals (e.g. striped hyaena Hyaena hyaena) or Eurasian griffon vultures Gypus fulvus, which did not occur at the regularly-stocked station.