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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Earthworm abundance and biomass not higher in maize plots with no-tillage; an experiment in Switzerland

Published source details

Wyss E. & Glasstetter M. (1992) Tillage treatments and earthworm distribution in a Swiss experimental corn field. Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 24, 1635-1639


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Undersow spring cereals, with clover for example Farmland Conservation

A trial at an experimental farm in 1989 on the Swiss Plateau, Switzerland (Wyss & Glasstetter 1992) found that earthworm (Lumbricidae) abundance and biomass were higher in a maize Zea mays plot undersown with grass than in conventionally managed maize, although statistical analyses were not presented. Control and undersown plots had averages of 127 and 145 earthworms/m2 and 45 and 71 g earthworm biomass/m2, respectively. The proportion of deep-burrowing earthworms was similar with 14 and 12% of individuals in the control and undersown plots respectively. A test strip of maize 14 m-long was undersown with grass in summer and compared with a control strip of conventional maize. Earthworms were sampled by hand-sorting 0.1 m3 of soil from each test strip, to a depth of 40 cm, on six dates between April and October 1989. There was no replication.

 

Plant more than one crop per field (intercropping) Farmland Conservation

A trial at an experimental farm on the Swiss Plateau, Switzerland, in 1989 (Wyss & Glasstetter 1992) found that earthworm (class: Oligochaeta) abundance but not biomass was higher in a maize Zea mays plot immediately followed by a rye grass Lolium 282 perenne crop (called a ‘catch crop’) to provide winter cover. Control and catch crop plots had averages of 127 and 111 earthworms/m2, and 45 and 64 g earthworm biomass/m2, respectively. The proportion of deep-burrowing earthworms was similar with 14 and 13% of individuals in the control and catch crop plots respectively. A test strip of maize 14 m long was sown with a rye grass catch crop in autumn, and compared with a control strip of conventional maize. Earthworms were sampled by hand-sorting 0.1 m3 of soil from each test strip, to a depth of 40 cm, on six dates between April and October 1989. There was no replication.

Reduce tillage Farmland Conservation

A trial at an experimental farm in 1989 on the Swiss Plateau, Switzerland (Wyss & Glasstetter 1992) found that earthworm (Lumbricidae) abundance and biomass were not higher in a no-tillage plot than other plots. No-tillage and control plots had averages of 47 and 127 earthworms/m2, and 57 and 45 g earthworm biomass/m2, respectively. There was a much higher proportion of deep-burrowing earthworms in the no-tillage plot (67% of individuals, compared to 11-14% of individuals in ploughed plots), which is why there were more individual worms in the control plot. Test strips of maize Zea mays 14 m-long were either managed with no-tillage (sowing directly into undisturbed stubble) or conventionally ploughed and harrowed. The no-tillage treatment also had rye grass Lolium spp. sown after the maize. Earthworms were sampled by hand-sorting 0.1 m3 of soil from each test strip, to a depth of 40 cm, on six dates between April and October 1989. There was no replication.