Study

Reaction of the spider coenoesis on different kinds of rotational set aside in agricultural fields

  • Published source details Weiss B. & Buchs W. (1997) Reaction of the spider coenoesis on different kinds of rotational set aside in agricultural fields. Mitteilungen Der Deutschen Gesellschaft Fuer Allgemeine Und Angewandte Entomologie, 11, 147-151

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Plant grass buffer strips/margins around arable or pasture fields

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Create uncultivated margins around intensive arable or pasture fields

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Plant nectar flower mixture/wildflower strips

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Plant grass buffer strips/margins around arable or pasture fields

    A replicated study in summer 1996 in central Germany (Weiss & Buchs 1997) found that spider (Araneae) species richness in plots sown with a grass mixture (36 spider species) was lower than plots sown with lacy phacelia Phacelia tanacetifolia and Egyptian clover Trifolium alexandrinum (40 spider spp.), but higher than in plots sown with lacy phacelia, buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum, common sunflower Helianthus annuus and common mallow Malva sylvestris (30 spider spp.). Spider abundance in grass mix plots (126 and 65 individuals in pitfall traps and photoeclectors respectively) was lower than in plots containing sundial lupine Lupinus perennis and common vetch Vicia sativa (155 and 124 individuals in pitfall traps/photoeclectors), but only significantly lower in the eclector samples. Note that most results in this study are not statistically tested. Eight different types of strips with three replicates each were tested: six seed mixtures containing mainly flowering plants (1-12 species), one mixture containing mainly grasses (red fescue Festuca rubra (64%), perennial rye grass Lolium perenne (25%) plus white clover T. repens (10%)) and one naturally regenerated treatment. Spiders were sampled using two pitfall traps and two photoeclectors in each plot.

  2. Create uncultivated margins around intensive arable or pasture fields

    A replicated study in summer 1996 in central Germany (Weiss & Buchs 1997) found that spider (Araneae) abundance in naturally regenerated plots (97 and 56 individuals in pitfall traps and photoeclectors respectively) was significantly lower than plots containing sundial lupin Lupinus perenne and common vetch Vicia sativa (155 and 124 individuals in pitfall traps and photoeclectors) and similar to plots with fodder radish Raphanus sativus oleiferus (104 and 49 individuals). Note that most results in this study are not statistically tested. Eight different types of strip with three replicates each were tested: six seed mixtures contained mainly flowering plants (1-12 species), one mixture contained mainly grass seeds (two species plus white clover Trifolium repens) and one naturally regenerated treatment. Spiders were sampled using two pitfall traps and two photoeclectors in each plot.

  3. Plant nectar flower mixture/wildflower strips

    A replicated study in summer 1996 in central Germany (Weiss & Buchs 1997) found that both species richness and abundance of spiders (Araneae) caught in sown wildflower strips depended greatly on the species composition of the seed mixtures used. Highest species richness was reported in plots containing phacelia Phacelia tanacetifolia and Egyptian clover Trifolium alexandrinum (40 spider species) and lowest diversity (30 species) in plots with phacelia, buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum, common sunflower Helianthus annuus and common mallow Malva sylvestris. Spider abundance was highest in plots containing sundial lupin Lupinus perenne and common vetch Vicia sativa in both pitfall traps and photoeclectors (155/124 individuals), significantly higher than in both naturally regenerated plots (97/56 individuals) and plots with fodder radish Raphanus sativus oleiferus (104/49 individuals). Note that most results in this study are not statistically tested. Eight different types of strip with three replicates each were tested: six seed mixtures contained mainly flowering plants (1-12 species), one mixture contained mainly grass seeds (two species plus white clover T. repens) and one naturally regenerated treatment. Spiders were sampled using two pitfall traps and two photoeclectors in each plot.

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