Study

Pesticide science and biotechnology. Proceedings of the 6th international congress of pesticide chemistry

  • Published source details Sotherton N.W. & Rands M.R.W. (1987) Pesticide science and biotechnology. Proceedings of the 6th international congress of pesticide chemistry. Ottawa, Canada, 10-15 August 1986, 433-436.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Restrict certain pesticides

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals for birds

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Restrict certain pesticides

    A small scale study in 1984-1985 of cereal fields treated with foliar fungicides (fungicides for fungal leaf diseases) in the UK (Sotherton & Rands 1987) found that chick food insect abundance was reduced to a greater extent following applications of Pyrazophos compared to other fungicides. Compared to untreated crops, chick food insects were reduced by 31-70% in crops treated with Pyrazophos, 10% with Propiconazole and 3% with Triadimefon applications. The effect of Pyrazophos was greater when applied to crops at an earlier growth stage (GS) (GS37: 70% reduction in chick food insects, GS50: 45%, GS60: 31%). Following Pyrazophos applications, total predatory arthropods were reduced by 25-48%, aphid-specific predators 35-84% (17% with Triadimefon) and parasitoids 34-55%. Fungicides were sprayed at GS50 in winter wheat in 1984. Pyrazophos was also sprayed at GS60 in spring barley (1984) and GS37 in winter barley (1985). Chick food insects were sampled by sweep nets or suction sampling.

  2. Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals for birds

    A small scale study of cereal fields treated with foliar fungicides in the UK (Sotherton & Rands 1987) found that chick food insect abundance was reduced to a greater extent following applications of Pyrazophos compared to other fungicides.  Compared to untreated crops, chick food insects were reduced by 31-70% in crops treated with Pyrazophos, 10% with Propiconazole and 3% with Triadimefon applications.   The effect of Pyrazophos was greater when applied at an earlier growth stage (GS37: 70%; GS50: 45%; GS60: 31% reduction).  Following Pyrazophos applications, total predatory arthropods were reduced by 25-48%; aphid specific predators 35-84% (17% with Triadimefon) and parasitoids 34-55%.  Fungicides were sprayed at GS 50 in winter wheat in 1984.  Pyrazophos was also sprayed at GS60 in spring barley (1984) and GS37 in winter barley (1985).   Chick food insects were sampled by sweep nets or suction sampling.

     

Output references

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