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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of field margins by foraging yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella

Published source details

Perkins A.J., Whittingham M.J., Morris A.J. & Bradbury R.B. (2002) Use of field margins by foraging yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 93, 413-420


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant grass buffer strips/margins around arable or pasture fields for birds Bird Conservation

A controlled study from May-August in 1995-7 and 1999 on a mixed arable and pastoral farm in Oxfordshire, UK (Perkins et al. 2002), found that yellowhammers Emberiza citronella spent significantly greater time foraging in grass margins and field boundaries than in other habitats. There was no difference between margins and boundaries, or between cut and uncut grass margins. However, greater use was made of both cut and uncut grass margins combined than field boundaries. Habitats surveyed were cut (1.8 km) or uncut (1.6 km) grass margins (2 or 10 m wide, at edges of arable field), field boundaries, arable fields (winter-sown cereals) and grass fields (pasture, silage and hay) found. Total area surveyed was 143 ha in 1995-7 and 107 ha in 1999.

 

Plant grass buffer strips/margins around arable or pasture fields Farmland Conservation

A controlled study from 1995 to 1997 and 1999 in Oxfordshire, UK (Perkins et al. 2002) found that yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella spent significantly more time foraging in grass margins and field boundaries than other habitats. A significantly greater number of foraging visits per unit area of available habitat were made to grass margins and field boundaries than to all other habitat types. There was no significant difference between use of grass margins and field boundary habitats or between cut and uncut grass margins. However, greater use was made of both cut and uncut grass margins combined than field boundaries. Total area surveyed was 142.8 ha in 1995-1997 and 107.0 ha in 1999. Five habitat types were studied on one mixed arable and pastoral farm: cut or uncut grass margins (2 or 10 m wide, at edge of arable field), field boundaries, arable fields (winter-sown cereals) and grass fields (pasture, silage and hay).