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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cutting and Fertilizing Grassland for Winter Goose Management

Published source details

Owen M. (1975) Cutting and Fertilizing Grassland for Winter Goose Management. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 39, 163-167


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide 'sacrificial' grasslands to reduce the impact of wild geese on crops Farmland Conservation

A replicated, controlled trial in the winter of 1972-1973 at a 6 ha pasture (periodically flooded by saltwater) in Gloucestershire, UK (Owen 1975), found that significantly more greater white-fronted geese Anser albifrons fed on fertilized and cut areas, compared to control areas (overall average of 30-35% of geese on cut, fertilized areas vs 17-20% on control areas, maximum of 65% use of cut, fertilized areas vs 20% for controls). Preferences decreased over time as preferred areas lost vegetation and became more crowded. Vegetation from experimental areas had a higher nitrogen content than that from control areas. Fertilization consisted of 125 kg/ha of ‘nitro-chalk’ - 25% nitrogen - applied in mid October. In mid-October, the grass was also cut to approximately 8 cm.

 

Fertilize artificial grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled trial in the winter of 1972-1973 at a 6 ha pasture (periodically flooded by saltwater) in Gloucestershire, UK (Owen 1975), found that significantly more greater white-fronted geese Anser albifrons fed on fertilised and cut areas, compared to control areas (overall average of 30-35% of geese on cut, fertilised areas vs. 17-20% on control areas; maximum of 65% use of cut, fertilised areas vs. 20% for controls). Preferences decreased over time as preferred areas lost vegetation and became more crowded. Vegetation from experimental areas had a higher nitrogen content than that from control areas. Fertilisation consisted of 125 kg/ha of ‘nitro-chalk’ – 25% nitrogen – applied in mid October. In mid-October, the grass was also cut to approximately 8 cm.