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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of vegetation management and raising the water table on nutrient dynamics and vegetation change in a wet grassland

Published source details

Oomes M.J.M., Olff H. & Altena H.J. (1996) Effects of vegetation management and raising the water table on nutrient dynamics and vegetation change in a wet grassland. Journal of Applied Ecology, 33, 576-588


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Raise water levels in ditches or grassland Farmland Conservation

A controlled, randomized study of a former improved pasture in the Netherlands (Oomes et al. 1996) found that raising the water level resulted in a more rapid establishment of species typical of wet grassland, than vegetation management (cutting and removing hay; cutting, mulching and leaving hay; topsoil removal to 5 cm followed by cutting and removing hay). In 1985, the water level was raised to its former level in one area (1.5-2 ha), the other area was left dry. Plant species composition was recorded annually (20-50 samples/plot).

 

Restore or create traditional water meadows Farmland Conservation

A controlled, randomized study of a former improved pasture in the Netherlands (Oomes et al. 1996) found that raising the water level resulted in a more rapid establishment of species typical of wet conditions, than vegetation management (cutting and removing hay; cutting, mulching and leaving hay; topsoil removal to 5 cm followed by cutting and removing hay). Hay removal plots had more new species than the mulched plots in the wet field (7 vs 2 species; 3 in dry field). Two years after topsoil removal, there were 37 species established in the wet field and 49 in the dry field, five years later there were 13 new species on wet fields and 22 on dry fields. In 1985, the water level was raised to its former level in one area (1.5-2 ha), the other area was left dry. The three management practices were implemented in each area: sod cutting (to remove topsoil) in one plot (375 m²) and hay removal and mulching each in five replicate plots (100 m²). Plant species composition was recorded annually (20-50 samples/plot).