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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Permanent and temporary linear habitats as food sources for the young of farmland birds

Published source details

Moreby S.J. (2002) Permanent and temporary linear habitats as food sources for the young of farmland birds. Pages 327-332 in: D.E. Chamberlain (ed.) Avian Landscape Ecology: Pure and Applied Issues in the Large-Scale Ecology of Birds. International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE(UK)), Aberdeen.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Farmland Conservation

A replicated study in June 2000 in ten edge habitats on an arable farm in Leicestershire, England (Moreby 2002) found that first-year wild bird cover had the highest density (not significant) of caterpillars (Lepidoptera). Weevil (Curculionidae) densities were similar in first- and second-year wild bird cover but lower than in edges of non-rotational set-aside. Spider (Araneae) and rove beetle (Staphylinidae) densities were lower in wild bird cover than in ungrazed pasture edges. Type of neighbouring crop did not affect invertebrate densities in the different habitats. Apart from the four habitats mentioned above, beetle banks, brood cover, hedge bottoms, sheep-grazed pasture edges, grass/wire fence lines and winter wheat headlands were included in the study. Invertebrates were sampled with a vacuum suction sampler in June 2000. This study was part of the same experimental set-up as Moreby & Southway (2002), Murray et al. (2002).

Create beetle banks Farmland Conservation

A replicated study in June 2000 in ten edge habitats on a lowland arable farm in Leicestershire, England (Moreby 2002) found that beetle banks contained the highest density of sawfly (Symphyta) larvae, significantly higher compared to hedge bottoms and winter wheat headlands, but not compared to grass/wire fence lines or edges of un-grazed pasture. Spider (Araneae) and rove beetle (Staphylinidae) densities were lower in beetle banks than in un-grazed pastures. Set-aside contained a higher density of weevils (Curculionidae) than beetle banks. There was no difference in ground beetle (Carabidae) or caterpillar (Lepidoptera) densities between habitats. Type of neighbouring crop did not affect invertebrate densities in the different habitats. Apart from the six habitats mentioned above, brood cover, one and two-year-old wild bird cover, and sheep-grazed pasture edges were included in the study. Invertebrates were sampled with a vacuum suction sampler in June 2000.

 

Provide or retain set-aside areas in farmland Farmland Conservation

A replicated site comparison study carried out in June 2000 in ten edge habitats at the arable Loddington Estate in Leicestershire, England (Moreby, 2002) found a higher density of weevils (Curculionoidea) in edges of non-rotational set-aside than all the other habitats studied. Spider (Aranae) and rove beetle (Staphylinidae) densities were lower in set-aside than in edges of un-grazed pastures. Beetle banks, brood cover, one- and two-year-old wild bird cover, hedge bottoms, sheep-grazed pasture edges, grass/wire fence lines and winter wheat headlands were also included in the study. Invertebrates were sampled with a vacuum suction-sampler in June 2000.