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Individual study: Dominant arthropod groups tended to have a higher abundance in arable fields with compost rather than inorganic fertiliser applications in eastern Austria

Published source details

Idinger J. & Kromp B. (1997) Ground photoeclector evaluation of different arthropod groups in unfertilized, inorganic and compost-fertilized cereal fields in eastern Austria. Biological Agriculture & Horticulture, 15, 171-176


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use organic rather than mineral fertilizers Farmland Conservation

In the same small controlled study in three fields on an organic farm at Obere Lobau, Austria as (Idinger 1995, Idinger et al. 1996), (Idinger & Kromp 1997), dominant arthropod groups tended to have a higher abundance in arable fields with compost rather than inorganic fertilizer applications. In the second year, the majority of dominant arthropod groups (15 of 24) had significantly higher abundance in compost plots, these included springtails (Isotomidae, Entomobryidae), rove beetles (Staphylinidae), long-horned flies (Nematocera), dark-winged fungus gnats (Sciaridae). Three groups were more abundant in the unfertilized plots and six in inorganic plots. Differences between treatments were only consistent over two years for a few groups. Non-biting midges (Chironomidae) and long-legged flies (Dolichopodidae) were significantly more abundant in compost plots, spiders (Araneae) and hypogastrurid springtails (Hypogastruridae) in unfertilized plots and humpbacked flies (Phoridae) and slender springtails (Entomobryidae) in inorganic fertilizer plots.