Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocation of red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus on the Sinnamary River, French Guyana

Published source details

Richard-Hansen C., Vié J.C. & de Thoisy B. (2000) Translocation of red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus in French Guiana. Biological Conservation, 93, 247-253


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate (capture & release) wild primates from development sites to natural habitat elsewhere Primate Conservation

A study in 1994-1995 in a primary forest at Petit Saut dam, French Guiana found that less than half of all red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus that were translocated to natural habitat elsewhere along with other interventions, survived over 18 months. Of the 16 females that were monitored with radio-tags over 18 months, survival rate was 44-63%. Deaths related to translocation included screwworm fly larvae infestations under radio-collars (N=2) and trauma (N=1).  Three females (19%) gave birth after release, but infants disappeared and probably died. All females studied for longer than three months (50%) settled within the release area. Of the 122 captured and translocated howlers from 28 different troops, ten out of 11 (91%) documented troops broke apart after release. Monkey groups were captured manually or with nets several months after the beginning of the flooding of the hydroelectric dam. All animals underwent veterinary screens before release in groups into habitat already occupied by the species. They were allowed to adapt to local habitat conditions before release. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present Primate Conservation

A study in 1994–1995 in a forest in French Guiana found that less than half of the red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus that were translocated and reintroduced into habitat already occupied by the species alongside other interventions, survived over 18 months. Of 16 females monitored only seven (44%) survived for 18 months. Two monkeys died from screwworm fly larvae infestations under radio-collars and one from trauma. Three of the 16 females gave birth after release, but all infants disappeared and probably died shortly afterwards. All females studied for longer than three months (50%) settled within the release area. Of the 11 documented translocated troops 10 (91%) broke apart after release. Overlapping home ranges and/or social interactions between translocated and resident animals were observed. Before release all animals were screened by vets, were allowed to adapt to local conditions, and were reintroduced in groups. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Conduct veterinary screens of animals before reintroducing/translocating them Primate Conservation

A study in 1994-1995 in primary forest at the Petit Saut hydroelectric dam in French Guiana found that less than half of the translocated red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus that underwent veterinary screens alongside other interventions, survived for at least 18 months. Of the 16 females monitored, seven (44%) females survived to the end of the study with a possible survival rate of 63%. Deaths related to the translocation process included screwworm fly larvae infestations under radio-collars (n=2) and trauma (n=1). Three (19%) females gave birth after release, but all infants disappeared and probably died. All females studied for longer than three months (50%) settled within the release area. Of the 122 captured and translocated howlers from 28 different troops, ten out of 11 (91%) documented troops broke apart post-release. All animals were anesthetized and examined by a veterinarian. After taking biological samples, all individuals were confirmed as healthy. Monkeys were translocated and reintroduced in groups into habitat already occupied by the species. They were allowed to adapt to local habitat conditions before their release. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Allow primates to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before introduction to the wild Primate Conservation

A study in 1994-1995 in primary forest at Petit Saut dam, French Guiana found that less than half of the translocated and monitored red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus that were allowed to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before their release along with other interventions, survived over 18 months post-release. Of the 16 females monitored for 18 months with radio-tags, seven females survived, with an estimated survival rate of 44-63%. Deaths related to the translocation process included screwworm fly larvae infestations under radio-collars (N=2) and trauma (N=1). Three (19%) females gave birth post-release, but all infants disappeared and probably died. All females studied for longer than three months (50%) settled within the release area. Of the 122 captured and translocated howlers from 28 different troops, ten out of 11 (91%) documented troops broke apart after release. Howlers spent up to 24 hours together in one of three forest enclosures, 3 km from the release site. All animals underwent veterinary screens before release and were reintroduced in groups into habitat already occupied by the species. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Reintroduce primates in groups Primate Conservation

A study in 1994-1995 in primary forest at Petit Saut hydroelectric dam in French Guiana found that less than half of the monitored red howler monkeys Alouatta seniculus that were translocated and reintroduced into their new habitat in groups along with other interventions, survived over 18 months. Of the 16 females monitored for 18 months, seven (44%) females survived with a possible survival rate of 63%. Deaths included screwworm fly larvae infestations under radio-collars (N=2) and trauma (N=1). Three (19%) females gave birth after release, but all infants disappeared and probably died. All females studied for longer than three months (50%) settled within the release area. Of the 28 different translocated troops (122 individuals) ten out of 11 (91%) documented troops broke apart post-release. All animals underwent veterinary screens before t release into habitat already occupied by the species. They were allowed to adapt to local habitat conditions for some time before their release. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.