Study

Do field margin characteristics influence songbird nest-site selection in adjacent hedgerows?

  • Published source details Holt C.A., Atkinson P.W., Vickery J.A. & Fuller R.J. (2010) Do field margin characteristics influence songbird nest-site selection in adjacent hedgerows?. Bird Study, 57, 392-392.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Undersow spring cereals, with clover for example

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Undersow spring cereals, with clover for example

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Undersow spring cereals, with clover for example

    A replicated study from April-July in 2006 on four livestock farms (3 replicates/farm) in southwest England (Holt et al. 2010) - the same study as Defra (2007) - found that dunnock Prunella modularis, but not Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula or chaffinch Fringella coelebs, nested at higher densities in hedges alongside field margins sown with either wild bird seed crops or barley undersown with grass and clover, compared to those next to grassy field edges under various management options (dunnocks: approximately 2.5 nests/km for seed crops vs. 0.3/km for grass margins; blackbirds: 1.0 vs. 1.3; chaffinch: 1.5 vs. 1.4). Margins were 10 m wide, 50 m long and located adjacent to existing hedgerows. Seed crop margins were sown with barley (undersown with grass/legumes) or a kale/quinoa mix. There were 12 replicates of each treatment.

     

  2. Undersow spring cereals, with clover for example

    A replicated study from April-July in 2006 on four livestock farms in southwest England (Holt et al. 2010) (same study as (Defra 2007, Potts et al. 2009)) found that dunnock Prunella modularis, but not Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula or chaffinch Fringella coelebs, nested at higher densities in hedges alongside field margins sown with either barley undersown with grass and clover Trifolium spp. or wild bird seed crops, compared to those next to grassy field edges under various management options (dunnock: approximately 2.5 nests/km for seed crops vs 0.3/km for grass margins, blackbird: 1.0 vs 1.3, chaffinch: 1.5 vs 1.4). There were three replicates/farm. Margins were 10 x 50 m and located adjacent to existing hedgerows. Seed crop margins were sown with barley (undersown with grass/legumes) or a kale/quinoa mix. There were 12 replicates of each treatment, three replicates on each farm.

     

  3. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

    A replicated study from April-July in 2006 on four livestock farms (3 replicates/farm) in southwest England (Holt et al. 2010) found that dunnock Prunella modularis, but not Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula or chaffinch, nested at higher densities in hedges alongside field margins sown with wild bird seed crops, or barley undersown with grass and clover, compared to those next to grassy field edges under various management options (dunnocks: approximately 2.5 nests/km for seed crops vs. 0.3/km for grass margins; blackbirds: 1.0 vs. 1.3; chaffinch: 1.5 vs. 1.4). Margins were 10 m wide, 50 m long and located adjacent to existing hedgerows. Seed crop margins were sown with barley (undersown with grass/legumes) or a kale/quinoa mix. There were 12 replicates of each treatment. This study reports on results from the same experiment as Defra 2007.

     

  4. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

    A replicated study from April-July in 2006 on four livestock farms in southwest England (Holt et al. 2010) found that dunnock Prunella modularis, but not Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula or chaffinch Fringella coelebs, nested at higher densities in hedges alongside field margins sown with wild bird seed crops, or barley undersown with grass and clover, compared to those next to grassy field edges under various management options (dunnock: approximately 2.5 nests/km for seed crops vs. 0.3/km for grass margins, blackbirds: 1.0 vs. 1.3, chaffinch: 1.5 vs. 1.4). Margins were 10 x 50 m and located adjacent to existing hedgerows. Seed crop margins were sown with barley (undersown with grass/legumes) or a kale Brassica spp./quinoa Chenopodium quinoa mix. There were 12 replicates of each treatment, three replicates on each farm. This study was part of the same experimental set-up as (Defra 2007, Pilgrim et al. 2007, Potts et al. 2009).

     

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