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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effectiveness of a bird-scaring streamer line and line shooter on the incidental capture of northern fulmar Fulmarus glacialis in the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Ålesund, Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Published source details

Løkkeborg S. & Robertson G. (2002) Seabird and longline interactions: effectiveness of a bird-scaring streamer line and line shooter on the incidental capture of northern fulmars Fulmarius glacialis. Biological Conservation, 106, 359-364


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use a line shooter to reduce seabird bycatch Bird Conservation

A replicated, randomised and controlled trial on a commercial long-lining vessel off the coast of mid-Norway in August 1999 (Løkkeborg & Robertson 2002), found that by-catch of northern fulmar Fulmarus glacialis was not significantly lower when a line shooter was used during line setting (13 fulmars hooked during 11 sets, 0.22 birds/1,000 hooks), compared with either control sets (32 fulmars in 11 sets, 0.52 birds/1,000 hooks) or with lines set using a streamer line as well (no birds caught on 11 sets with just the streamer line vs. a single bird or 0.02 birds/1,000 hooks on 11 sets with the streamer and shooter). This study is also discussed in ‘Use streamer lines to reduce seabird bycatch on longlines’.

 

Use streamer lines to reduce seabird bycatch on longlines Bird Conservation

A randomised, replicated and controlled trial on a commercial longlining vessel off the coast of mid-Norway in August 1999 (Løkkeborg & Robertson 2002), found that bycatch of northern fulmar Fulmarus glacialis fell to zero when a streamer line was deployed during line setting and just one bird (0.02 birds/1,000 hooks) when both a streamer line and line shooter were used, compared with 32 fulmars (0.52 birds/1,000 hooks) during control line sets, and 13 fulmars (0.22 birds/1,000 hooks) when just a line shooter was used. Eleven repeats of each treatment were used, with lines set during daylight. Streamer lines were 90 m long, with a 69 m streamer section with twelve 8 cm wide yellow tarpaulin streamers, 5.4 m apart, 0.5-2 m long. This study is also discussed in ‘Use a line shooter to reduce seabird bycatch’.