Study

Do agri-environment measures for birds on arable land deliver for other taxa?

  • Published source details Fisher G.P., MacDonald M.A. & Anderson G.Q.A. (2007) Do agri-environment measures for birds on arable land deliver for other taxa?. Aspects of Applied Biology, 81, 213-219.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Create skylark plots

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Leave cultivated, uncropped margins or plots (includes 'lapwing plots')

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Leave overwinter stubbles

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands)

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Create skylark plots

    A 2007 review of published and unpublished literature (Fisher et al. 2007) found one study (Ogilvy et al. 2006) with experimental evidence of the benefits of skylark plots to plants (although undesirable plant species prevalent) and invertebrates (invertebrate abundance higher in the surrounding crop).

     

  2. Leave cultivated, uncropped margins or plots (includes 'lapwing plots')

    A 2007 review of published and unpublished literature (Fisher et al. 2007) found experimental evidence of benefits of fallow plots to plants, from one study on Salisbury Plain Training Area, UK (Walker et al. 2001). Stone curlew plots, not sprayed with herbicide, hosted rare arable weed species including dense-flowered fumitory Fumaria densiflora and red hemp nettle Galeopsis angustifolia.

    Additional reference:

    Walker K., Pywell R.F., Carvell C. & Meek W.R. (2001). Arable weed survey of the Salisbury Plain Training Area. Abbots Ripton: Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

  3. Leave overwinter stubbles

    A 2007 review of published and unpublished literature (Fisher et al. 2007) found experimental evidence of benefits of overwinter stubble to plants (one study: (Critchley et al. 2004)) and use of overwinter stubbles by brown hares Lepus europaeus (one correlative study not included here). This review assessed the evidence for wider benefits of UK agri-environment prescriptions aimed at conserving wild birds on arable land.

     

  4. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

    A 2007 review of published and unpublished literature (Fisher et al. 2007) found experimental evidence of benefits of wild bird seed or cover mix to plants (one study (Critchley et al. 2004)) and invertebrates (true bugs (Hemiptera) Gardner et al. 2001, and bumblebees Bombus spp. Allen et al. 2001).

    Additional references:

    Allen D.S., Gundrey A.L. & Gardner S.M. (2001) Bumblebees. Technical appendix to ecological evaluation of arable stewardship pilot scheme 1998-2000. ADAS, Wolverhampton, UK.

    Gardner S.M., Allen D.S., Woodward J., Mole A.C. & Gundrey A.L. (2001) True bugs. Technical appendix to ecological evaluation of arable stewardship pilot scheme 1998-2000. ADAS, Wolverhampton, UK.

  5. Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands)

    A 2007 review of published and unpublished literature (Fisher et al. 2007) found experimental evidence of benefits of conservation headlands to plants (four studies: Helenius 1994, Chiverton 1994, Kleijn & van der Voort 1997, Critchley et al. 2004), rare arable plants (when fertilizer also reduced, one study: Kleijn & van der Voort 1997), invertebrates (some groups, five studies: Hassall et al. 1992, Helenius 1994, Chiverton 1994 , Dover 1997, de Snoo et al. 1998) and mammals (three studies not summarized here, showed potential value through increased food resources).

     

Output references
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