Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Rawcliffe Bridge, arable production and biodiversity, hand in hand

Published source details

Bryson R.J., Hartwell G. & Gladwin R. (2007) Rawcliffe Bridge, arable production and biodiversity, hand in hand. Aspects of Applied Biology, 81, 155-160


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide nest boxes for birds Farmland Conservation

A trial from 2003 to 2005 on a single farm, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorkshire, UK (Bryson et al. 2007) found that nest boxes were 54%, 50% and 68% occupied in 2003, 2004 and 2005 respectively. In 2003, all five boxes designed for tree sparrow Passer montanus were occupied. In 2005, 20 tree sparrow boxes (70% of the 28 provided) were occupied. The number of breeding tree sparrows on the farm increased from 6 to 20 pairs between 2003 and 2005. In the years 2003, 2004 and 2005, 32, 60 and 84 bird nest boxes were put up, including some designed for tree sparrows. They were inspected in February each year. Birds on the farm were monitored five times each year from 2003 to 2005, by walking the field boundaries. The number of breeding pairs/ha was estimated from clusters of sightings.

 

Restore or create forests Bird Conservation

A study at Rawcliffe Bridge farm, East Yorkshire, UK (Bryson et al. 2007), recorded 14 bird species in a 3 ha patch of woodland, 10-12 years after planting, including linnet Carduelis cannabina and willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus. Three hectares of native broad-leaved woodland, berry-bearing shrubs and Corsican pine were planted on the farm in 1993-1994. Birds on the farm were monitored five times each year from 2003 to 2005, by walking the field boundaries. The number of breeding pairs/ha was estimated from clusters of sightings.

 

Pay farmers to cover the costs of bird conservation measures Bird Conservation

A single farm, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorkshire, UK (Bryson et al. 2007), with a combination of conservation measures prescribed under the English Entry Level Stewardship Scheme had higher densities of some bird species than the average for UK lowland farms. Meadow pipit, reed bunting, Eurasian skylark, grey partridge, corn bunting and yellow wagtail occurred in higher numbers in each monitoring year than the average lowland farm density (provided by the British Trust for Ornithology). For example, there were between 12 and 22 meadow pipit pairs/100 ha at Rawbridge, compared to a national average of <3. Birds on the farm were monitored five times each year from 2003 to 2005, by walking the field boundaries. The number of breeding pairs/ha was estimated from clusters of sightings.

Pay farmers to cover the cost of conservation measures (as in agri-environment schemes) Farmland Conservation

A single farm, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorkshire, UK (Bryson et al. 2007) with a combination of conservation measures prescribed under the Entry Level Stewardship Scheme had higher densities of some bird species than the average for UK lowland farms. Meadow pipit Anthus pratensis, reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus, Eurasian skylark Alauda arvensis, grey partridge Perdix perdix, corn bunting E. calandra and yellow wagtail Motacilla flava occurred in higher numbers in each monitoring year than the average lowland farm density (provided by the British Trust for Ornithology). For example, there were between 12 and 22 meadow pipit pairs/100 ha at Rawbridge, compared to a national average of less than three. Birds on the farm were monitored five times each year from 2003 to 2005, by walking the field boundaries. The number of breeding pairs/ha was estimated from clusters of sightings.

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for songbirds Bird Conservation

A trial from 2003 to 2005 on a single farm, Rawcliffe Bridge, East Yorkshire, UK (Bryson et al. 2007) found that nest boxes were 54%, 50% and 68% occupied in 2003, 2004 and 2005 respectively. In 2003, all five boxes designed for tree sparrow were occupied. In 2005, 20 tree sparrow Passer montanus boxes (70% of the 28 provided) were occupied. The number of breeding tree sparrows on the farm increased from 6 to 20 pairs between 2003 and 2005. In the years 2003, 2004 and 2005, 32, 60 and 84 bird nest boxes were put up, including some designed for tree sparrows. They were inspected in February each year. Birds on the farm were monitored five times each year from 2003 to 2005, by walking the field boundaries. The number of breeding pairs/ha was estimated from clusters of sightings.