Study

Do meadow birds profit from agri-environment schemes in Dutch agricultural landscapes?

  • Published source details Breeuwer A., Berendse F., Willems F., Foppen R., Teunissen W., Schekkerman H. & Goedhart P. (2009) Do meadow birds profit from agri-environment schemes in Dutch agricultural landscapes? Biological Conservation, 142, 2949-2953

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Delay haying/mowing

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Delay mowing or first grazing date on pasture or grassland

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Delay haying/mowing

    A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1,040 grassland areas in the Netherlands, between 1990 and 2002 (Breeuwer et al. 2009), found that nesting densities of black-tailed godwit Limosa limosa and redshank Tringa totanus were higher in areas with management agreements with postponed mowing, but these differences were present before the agreements came into effect. Population trends were similar between management and control areas for godwits and Eurasian oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus, but northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus and redshank declined on management areas, relative to controls. Mowing was postponed on management areas to the end of May or beginning of June.

     

  2. Delay mowing or first grazing date on pasture or grassland

    A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1,040 grassland areas in the Netherlands, between 1990 and 2002 (Breeuwer et al. 2009), found that nesting densities of black-tailed godwit Limosa limosa and redshank Tringa totanus were higher in areas with management agreements with postponed mowing, but these differences were present before the agreements came into effect. Population trends were similar between management and control areas for black-tailed godwit and Eurasian oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, but northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus and redshank declined on management areas, relative to controls. Mowing was postponed on management areas to the end of May or beginning of June.

     

Output references

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