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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Management of set-aside to enhance biodiversity: the wild bird cover option

Published source details

Boatman N.D. & Bence S.L. (2000) Management of set-aside to enhance biodiversity: the wild bird cover option. Aspects of Applied Biology, 62, 73-78


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Farmland Conservation

A small study of set-aside strips from 1995 to 1999 at Loddington, Leicestershire, UK (Boatman & Bence 2000) found that set-aside sown with wild bird cover was used by nesting Eurasian skylark Alauda arvensis and butterflies (Lepidoptera) significantly more than other habitats. The majority of skylark territories found were within set-aside strips (margins or midfield) sown with wild bird cover (1995: 76%, 1996: 65%, 1997: 71%, 1999: 55%), although the habitat covered only 8-10% of the area. The habitat was also used more for foraging than all habitats, except linseed Linum usitatissimum. Transects along wild bird cover set-aside strips also had more butterfly records than any other habitat in 1997 and 1998 (28-40% vs 1-18%). Wild bird cover was sown with either cereal-based or kale-based Brassica spp. mixtures. Skylark territories were recorded in 1995-1997 and 1999 and nests were located in 1999 and foraging trips observed for two 1.5 hour periods. Two butterfly transects were walked weekly from April-September.

 

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Bird Conservation

A small study of set-aside strips over five years at Loddington, Leicestershire, UK (Boatman & Bence 2000), found that set-aside sown with wild bird cover was used by nesting Eurasian skylarks Alauda arvensis significantly more than other habitats.  The majority of skylark territories found were within set-aside strips (margins or midfield) sown with wild bird cover (55-76% each year), although the habitat covered only 8-10% of the area.  The habitat was also used more for foraging than all others, except linseed. Wild bird cover was sown with either cereal-based or kale-based mixtures.  Skylark territories were recorded in 1995-1997 and 1999. Nests were located in 1999 and foraging trips observed for two one and a half hour periods.