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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Abundance and diversity of birds is generally insensitive to mowing and burning management in fragmented tallgrass prairies, DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa, USA

Published source details

van Dyke F., van Kley S.E., Page C.E. & van Beek J.G. (2004) Restoration efforts for plant and bird communities in tallgrass prairies using prescribed burning and mowing. Restoration Ecology, 12, 575-585


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Mow or cut natural grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated, randomised and controlled study in DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa, USA (van Dyke et al. 2004), found that bird communities were not fundamentally different between areas of tallgrass prairies mown on a 3-4 year rotation and unmanaged or burned prairies (12 species/site for four mowed areas vs. 10 species/site for four burned and 11 species/site for four controls). This study is discussed in detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.

 

Use prescribed burning on grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated, randomised and controlled study in DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa, USA, in 1998-1999 (van Dyke et al. 2004), found that the average species richness of tallgrass prairie blocks (3-10 ha) was similar for four burned sites (10), mowed sites (12) and controls (11). Community composition was also similar. Burning and mowing took place from 22 April-11 May 1999.